BritCaster.com - aggregated UK podcast feed BritCaster.com brings the entire UK podcasting spectrum into a single location, enabling you to samle the best of UK audio and video podcasts in one place. http://britcaster.com en 20 February 2018, 3:27 BCAggregator The No1 in aggregated podcast feeds BritCaster provides the only place where you can find a comprehensive and constantly refreshed feed containing the latest podcast programmes to be released from within the UK. BritCaster.com Podcast Image britcaster,UK,British,English,Scottish, Welsh,Irish,Ireland,England,Wales,Scotland,podcast,feed,sport,entertainment,news,talk,music info@britcaster.com BritCaster Admin 2014 – Chinese Year of the Horse – The Horse that Ran Away 2014 is the Chinese Year of the Horse - starting on January 31. Hope you all have a wonderful year ! This is a chinese tale about a man whose prize possession was his one and only horse. When it ran away, everyone thought he had suffered the most terrible bad luck - but he was wise and saw things differently.

The post 2014 – Chinese Year of the Horse – The Horse that Ran Away appeared first on Storynory Free Audio Stories For Kids.

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27 Dec 2013 @ 08:03 am +0000 http://www.storynory.com Storynory - Stories For Kids 2014 is the Chinese Year of the Horse - starting on January 31. Hope you all have a wonderful year ! This is a chinese tale about a man whose prize possession was his one and only horse. When it ran away, everyone thought he had suffered the most terrible bad luck - but he was wise and saw things differently. The post 2014 – Chinese Year of the Horse – The Horse that Ran Away appeared first on Storynory Free Audio Stories For Kids. Storynory - Stories For Kids http://www.storynory.com
The John Dredge Nothing to Do with Anything Show: Series 2, Programme 5 John Dredge says goodbye to 2012, also known as the Chinese Year of the Accoutrement, with yet another one of those crazy end-of-year round-ups of the year’s most shocking household implements. There will also be odd noises of all shapes and sizes, plus an argy-bargy of aquatic goodies including the sound of a very large splash, courtesy of our friends at Thames Water. All this, plus Leighton Buzzard in Color - whoopee! With Richard Cray, Anna Emerson, Greg Haiste, and James Shakeshaft.

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31 Dec 2012 @ 01:00 am +0000 http://404media.blogspot.com 404 Funny John Dredge says goodbye to 2012, also known as the Chinese Year of the Accoutrement, with yet another one of those crazy end-of-year round-ups of the year’s most shocking household implements. There will also be odd noises of all shapes and sizes, plus an argy-bargy of aquatic goodies including the sound of a very large splash, courtesy of our friends at Thames Water. All this, plus Leighton Buzzard in Color - whoopee! With Richard Cray, Anna Emerson, Greg Haiste, and James Shakeshaft. 404 Funny http://404media.blogspot.com
How much speaker how much learner?
Hello again Today I want to make a suggestion about how we can make a decision on our language skills. People say “I am a learner of English,” “ I am learning French”, “I learn Italian” etc This means that we think of ourselves as “learners” , “students” “pupil” Then people may say: “I am a beginner of Chinese” “I speak some German” “I can get by in Russian” All the time we make these sorts of statements to other people, particularly native speakers, we make a judgement of our ability and class ourselves as a “learner”. I want to suggest that we think of ourselves as both learner AND speaker. This way we can make a judgement in a different way which I believe will help us improve and enjoy language. For example I would say that I am 80% speaker of French and 20% learner I would say that I am 60% speaker of German and 40% learner I would say that I am 10% speaker of Chinese and 90% learner I would say that I am 5% speaker of Spanish and 95% learner This rating changes as we feel we know more and are confident in speaking. Even as a native speaker of English I would also say that I am a learner I think I am maybe 98% speaker of English and 2% learner. This is because I learn new phrases and words in English as I learn new things about my language or as new words come into the language. For example I did not know the word “Podcast” two years ago, but now I use the word a lot. These figures need not be very accurate – they are just a way of judging our language skills. My idea is that we rate our speaking to learning depending on our own feelings and attitude to the language I believe the more we tell ourselves we can call ourselves a “speaker” – even if the percentage is quite low, the more we will feel proud, enjoy speaking as well as learning and make great progress. Bye for now Be good be happy

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21 Mar 2009 @ 06:19 am +0000 https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/alanlancs1 Alan Palmer's Language Chat podcasts Hello again Today I want to make a suggestion about how we can make a decision on our language skills. People say “I am a learner of English,” “ I am learning French”, “I learn Italian” etc This means that we think of ourselves as “learners” , “students” “pupil” Then people may say: “I am a beginner of Chinese” “I speak some German” “I can get by in Russian” All the time we make these sorts of statements to other people, particularly native speakers, we make a judgement of our ability and class ourselves as a “learner”. I want to suggest that we think of ourselves as both learner AND speaker. This way we can make a judgement in a different way which I believe will help us improve and enjoy language. For example I would say that I am 80% speaker of French and 20% learner I would say that I am 60% speaker of German and 40% learner I would say that I am 10% speaker of Chinese and 90% learner I would say that I am 5% speaker of Spanish and 95% learner This rating changes as we feel we know more and are confident in speaking. Even as a native speaker of English I would also say that I am a learner I think I am maybe 98% speaker of English and 2% learner. This is because I learn new phrases and words in English as I learn new things about my language or as new words come into the language. For example I did not know the word “Podcast” two years ago, but now I use the word a lot. These figures need not be very accurate – they are just a way of judging our language skills. My idea is that we rate our speaking to learning depending on our own feelings and attitude to the language I believe the more we tell ourselves we can call ourselves a “speaker” – even if the percentage is quite low, the more we will feel proud, enjoy speaking as well as learning and make great progress. Bye for now Be good be happy Alan Palmer\'s Language Chat podcasts https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/alanlancs1
Reading and Listening Practice (Article about tea)
China, the homeland of tea It is universally acknowledged that China is the original tea-growing area, as well as the first country to grow, produce and drink tea. In the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) Dynasties a popular custom was tea appraising. Over the long history of drinking tea, a special and simple Chinese tea culture came into being. Drinking tea was not only for quenching thirst or for enjoyment, but also for the promotion of friendship and mutual understanding. Folk customs of drinking tea reflected the ancient Chinese people's great interest in tea culture. (to appraise – to value, to judge) to quench- to satisfy (mutual – common) People often used tea as a betrothal gift; for it could not be "transplanted." After accepting tea as a betrothal gift, a girl could not capriciously change her decision to marry her fiancé. Betrothal – promise of marriage capricious – impulsive - reckless Entertainment of guests to tea is the most fundamental social behavior in the Chinese people's contacts with each other. When a guest comes, the Chinese will offer him or her a cup of tea to express friendship. Fundamental –basic, original China is the home country of tea. Before the Tang Dynasty (618-907), Chinese tea was exported by land and sea, first to Japan and Korea, then to India and Central Asia and, in the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties, to the Arabian Peninsula. In the early period of the 17th century, Chinese tea was exported to Europe, where the upper class adopted the fashion of drinking tea. Chinese tea, like Chinese silk and China, is an outstanding contribution to the world's material and spiritual civilization. Adopted – take on China is the homeland of tea. It is believed that China had tea-shrubs as early as five to six thousand years ago, and human cultivation of tea plants dates back two thousand years. Tea from China, along with her silk and porcelain, began to be known over the world more than a thousand years ago and has since always been an important Chinese export. At present more than forty countries in the world grow tea, with Asian countries producing 90% of the world's total output. All tea trees in other countries have their origin directly or indirectly in China. The word for tea leaves or tea as a drink in many countries is a derivative from the Chinese character "cha." The Russians call it "cha'i", which sounds like "chaye" (tea leaves) as it is pronounced in northern China, and the English word "tea" sounds similar to the pronunciation of its counterpart in Xiamen (Amoy). The Japanese character for tea is written exactly the same as it is in Chinese, though pronounced with a slight difference. The habit of tea drinking spread to Japan in the 6th century, but it was not introduced to Europe and America till the 17th and 18th centuries. Now the number of tea drinkers in the world is legion and is still on the increase. Derivative – taken from, original legion – great many

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1 Dec 2008 @ 06:26 am +0000 https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/alanlancs1 Alan Palmer's Language Chat podcasts China, the homeland of tea It is universally acknowledged that China is the original tea-growing area, as well as the first country to grow, produce and drink tea. In the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) Dynasties a popular custom was tea appraising. Over the long history of drinking tea, a special and simple Chinese tea culture came into being. Drinking tea was not only for quenching thirst or for enjoyment, but also for the promotion of friendship and mutual understanding. Folk customs of drinking tea reflected the ancient Chinese people\'s great interest in tea culture. (to appraise – to value, to judge) to quench- to satisfy (mutual – common) People often used tea as a betrothal gift; for it could not be \"transplanted.\" After accepting tea as a betrothal gift, a girl could not capriciously change her decision to marry her fiancé. Betrothal – promise of marriage capricious – impulsive - reckless Entertainment of guests to tea is the most fundamental social behavior in the Chinese people\'s contacts with each other. When a guest comes, the Chinese will offer him or her a cup of tea to express friendship. Fundamental –basic, original China is the home country of tea. Before the Tang Dynasty (618-907), Chinese tea was exported by land and sea, first to Japan and Korea, then to India and Central Asia and, in the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties, to the Arabian Peninsula. In the early period of the 17th century, Chinese tea was exported to Europe, where the upper class adopted the fashion of drinking tea. Chinese tea, like Chinese silk and China, is an outstanding contribution to the world\'s material and spiritual civilization. Adopted – take on China is the homeland of tea. It is believed that China had tea-shrubs as early as five to six thousand years ago, and human cultivation of tea plants dates back two thousand years. Tea from China, along with her silk and porcelain, began to be known over the world more than a thousand years ago and has since always been an important Chinese export. At present more than forty countries in the world grow tea, with Asian countries producing 90% of the world\'s total output. All tea trees in other countries have their origin directly or indirectly in China. The word for tea leaves or tea as a drink in many countries is a derivative from the Chinese character \"cha.\" The Russians call it \"cha\'i\", which sounds like \"chaye\" (tea leaves) as it is pronounced in northern China, and the English word \"tea\" sounds similar to the pronunciation of its counterpart in Xiamen (Amoy). The Japanese character for tea is written exactly the same as it is in Chinese, though pronounced with a slight difference. The habit of tea drinking spread to Japan in the 6th century, but it was not introduced to Europe and America till the 17th and 18th centuries. Now the number of tea drinkers in the world is legion and is still on the increase. Derivative – taken from, original legion – great many Alan Palmer\'s Language Chat podcasts https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/alanlancs1
More advice on English pronuciation
Hello everybody. Alan here. Thanks for listening to my podcast. www.alanlancs1.podomatic.com Today I want to talk about some of the difficulties with English pronunciation. There are certain letters or combination of letters that are often difficult for people learning English. I want to demonstrate some of these difficulties and ways to help your pronunciation sound more English. Firstly, I must say that I speak with a northern English accent and as such, my English pronunciation is a little bit different to London English or American English. So let's start with some vowel sounds. A E I O U In English, we cannot just read word and know how it is pronounced. Take the word “right” for example. The “righ” is pronounced like the word “rye” or the “ri” in the word “sterile” So we must always learn the correct pronunciation from teachers, recordings or from dictionaries that use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) So, which are the most common sounds that can often be pronounced differently by people learning English, than the pronunciation used by a native English speaker? This depends on the nationality of the person learning English I think. Many people who speak other European languages sometimes pronounce “e” as “ee” ( as in “veeseet” instead of visit) and “a” as “eh” ( “ehpple” instead of apple) However, sometimes the sound of “e” is “ee” and the sound of “a” is “eh” as in the word “eat” and the word “any”. For those of you who speak European languages, try saying this: “ When I visit my mother, if she has any, she always gives me an apple to eat because she says it does me good to eat fruit” People who speak Chinese (as a native language) often mistake an “l” sound for an “r” so “right” sounds like “light” and sometimes they add another syllable to a word when there isn't one. As in for example the words “and” which becomes sometimes “and-a” and “is” becomese “is-a” So for those of you listening who are Chinese, try saying this: “I know when I have the right light for reading, it is when I can see the text and the text is clear to see” English vowels are often pronounced as diphthongs which sound like two vowels together Bay for example is spoken like “bay-ee” Day is spoken like “day-ee” Go is spoken like “goh-u” Fine is spoken like “fye-een” Sometimes English people pronounce some words a little different to Americans: “Stupid” (English) “ Stupid” (American) Take care with these sounds: “th” To get this sound (which I think is very difficult) is put the very tip of your tongue touching your top teeth very softly and the allow a little air out and pull your tongue back quickly. For the other “th” sound as in: “the end” for example, just allow your voice to sound at the same time Try saying: “the thing that I think is that their thoughts are thoroughly thought-out at the end” “r” To get the “r” position correct. Curl your tongue back a little and let your tongue go flat as you say a word. Try saying this: “Roger ran after the rabbit and really regretted not reaching it” “w” To get the “w” sound try putting your lips to say “oo” like “food” and as you say the “w” let your jaw slightly drop – but only a little bit. Try saying this: “when I went with my wife to Wales, we wanted to go walking but it was a wet weekend” “v” this is sometimes difficult for Spanish speakers. To get the “v” sound put your top teeth on your bottom lip softly say the “v” and lower your jaw slightly – but only a little bit Try saying this: “vans are very wonderful fun vehicles” I have put a “w” word and an ‘f” word there for you to show you the difference between “v” and”w” Try to keep the rhythm of the speech in a similar way to English peoples' The way to do this is to listen for the word intonation (stress) on the words and copy them. Without intonation, here is a sentence: “This sentence shows where we put stress on words when we speak” With intonation “This sentence shows where we put stress on words when we speak” Can you hear the difference? Finally, for this podcast, never be afraid to speak a little bit slower, because this gives you more time to say the words and think a little before you say anything. This is very useful when reading out loud. To give you an example, which do you think sounds better? I like to show you how to speak English better, and sometimes it is better to speak a little more slowly to make the language sound clear to listeners. It is fine, no English person should ever criticise you for doing this” So you can try to break up the sentence a little bit…. So, I hope you find this podcast useful for your pronunication. The important thing is never to worry about pronunciation. The most important thing is to be understood. In fact many foreign accents sound nice to English people. Bye for now Be good be happy

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21 Nov 2008 @ 06:07 am +0000 https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/alanlancs1 Alan Palmer's Language Chat podcasts Hello everybody. Alan here. Thanks for listening to my podcast. www.alanlancs1.podomatic.com Today I want to talk about some of the difficulties with English pronunciation. There are certain letters or combination of letters that are often difficult for people learning English. I want to demonstrate some of these difficulties and ways to help your pronunciation sound more English. Firstly, I must say that I speak with a northern English accent and as such, my English pronunciation is a little bit different to London English or American English. So let\'s start with some vowel sounds. A E I O U In English, we cannot just read word and know how it is pronounced. Take the word “right” for example. The “righ” is pronounced like the word “rye” or the “ri” in the word “sterile” So we must always learn the correct pronunciation from teachers, recordings or from dictionaries that use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) So, which are the most common sounds that can often be pronounced differently by people learning English, than the pronunciation used by a native English speaker? This depends on the nationality of the person learning English I think. Many people who speak other European languages sometimes pronounce “e” as “ee” ( as in “veeseet” instead of visit) and “a” as “eh” ( “ehpple” instead of apple) However, sometimes the sound of “e” is “ee” and the sound of “a” is “eh” as in the word “eat” and the word “any”. For those of you who speak European languages, try saying this: “ When I visit my mother, if she has any, she always gives me an apple to eat because she says it does me good to eat fruit” People who speak Chinese (as a native language) often mistake an “l” sound for an “r” so “right” sounds like “light” and sometimes they add another syllable to a word when there isn\'t one. As in for example the words “and” which becomes sometimes “and-a” and “is” becomese “is-a” So for those of you listening who are Chinese, try saying this: “I know when I have the right light for reading, it is when I can see the text and the text is clear to see” English vowels are often pronounced as diphthongs which sound like two vowels together Bay for example is spoken like “bay-ee” Day is spoken like “day-ee” Go is spoken like “goh-u” Fine is spoken like “fye-een” Sometimes English people pronounce some words a little different to Americans: “Stupid” (English) “ Stupid” (American) Take care with these sounds: “th” To get this sound (which I think is very difficult) is put the very tip of your tongue touching your top teeth very softly and the allow a little air out and pull your tongue back quickly. For the other “th” sound as in: “the end” for example, just allow your voice to sound at the same time Try saying: “the thing that I think is that their thoughts are thoroughly thought-out at the end” “r” To get the “r” position correct. Curl your tongue back a little and let your tongue go flat as you say a word. Try saying this: “Roger ran after the rabbit and really regretted not reaching it” “w” To get the “w” sound try putting your lips to say “oo” like “food” and as you say the “w” let your jaw slightly drop – but only a little bit. Try saying this: “when I went with my wife to Wales, we wanted to go walking but it was a wet weekend” “v” this is sometimes difficult for Spanish speakers. To get the “v” sound put your top teeth on your bottom lip softly say the “v” and lower your jaw slightly – but only a little bit Try saying this: “vans are very wonderful fun vehicles” I have put a “w” word and an ‘f” word there for you to show you the difference between “v” and”w” Try to keep the rhythm of the speech in a similar way to English peoples\' The way to do this is to listen for the word intonation (stress) on the words and copy them. Without intonation, here is a sentence: “This sentence shows where we put stress on words when we speak” With intonation “This sentence shows where we put stress on words when we speak” Can you hear the difference? Finally, for this podcast, never be afraid to speak a little bit slower, because this gives you more time to say the words and think a little before you say anything. This is very useful when reading out loud. To give you an example, which do you think sounds better? I like to show you how to speak English better, and sometimes it is better to speak a little more slowly to make the language sound clear to listeners. It is fine, no English person should ever criticise you for doing this” So you can try to break up the sentence a little bit…. So, I hope you find this podcast useful for your pronunication. The important thing is never to worry about pronunciation. The most important thing is to be understood. In fact many foreign accents sound nice to English people. Bye for now Be good be happy Alan Palmer\'s Language Chat podcasts https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/alanlancs1
Episode 12: Appreciation Days, Dodgy Charity & Chinese Resturaunts We apologise in advance for the apalling sound quality(laptop fan) and the fact that we have only put this up Monday both are caused by the fact that our computer has crashed (excuses, excuses). Anyway this weeks podcast is our longest podcast to date so there's even more randomness to enjoy. We dive into the seriously strange world of Appreciation Days:
  • 1. World toilet day 19 Nov
  • 2. Spam appreciation week 6-12 mar
  • 3. Talk like a pirate day 19 sep
  • 4. Day of older persons 1 oct
  • 5. Loud tie week 29jan-5 feb
  • 6. World television day 21 nov
  • 7. Sleep in day 16 oct
  • 8. World naturists day 1 may
  • 9. Work your proper hours day 24 feb
  • 10. Arthritus awareness week 3-7 jan

As well as this we bring the usual features such as The News, Plug Of The Week & Lawsuit Of The Week. Please take time out just to vote for us on Podcast Alley or leave a review on iTunes. Thanks for listening and feel free to drop us an email.

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30 Oct 2006 @ 12:00 pm +0000 http://therandomguidetothegalaxy.blogspot.com The Random Guide To The Galaxy We apologise in advance for the apalling sound quality(laptop fan) and the fact that we have only put this up Monday both are caused by the fact that our computer has crashed (excuses, excuses). Anyway this weeks podcast is our longest podcast to date so there\'s even more randomness to enjoy. We dive into the seriously strange world of Appreciation Days: 1. World toilet day 19 Nov 2. Spam appreciation week 6-12 mar3. Talk like a pirate day 19 sep 4. Day of older persons 1 oct 5. Loud tie week 29jan-5 feb 6. World television day 21 nov 7. Sleep in day 16 oct 8. World naturists day 1 may9. Work your proper hours day 24 feb 10. Arthritus awareness week 3-7 jan As well as this we bring the usual features such as The News, Plug Of The Week & Lawsuit Of The Week. Please take time out just to vote for us on Podcast Alley or leave a review on iTunes. Thanks for listening and feel free to drop us an email. The Random Guide To The Galaxy http://therandomguidetothegalaxy.blogspot.com